Sublime Forum

Sublime Merge: Tabs please!

#1

Just like Sublime Text, I’d love to see tabs available in Merge. I like to have one window open with multiple tabs (full screened) and then I use a key-command to quickly switch projects (Merge already has it, as Command+Shift+O).

Loving it though, very snappy. Looking forward to ditching SourceTree :innocent:

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#2

+1 here. Having multiple repositories within one “project” would be a nice time-saver. I typically have 3-7 related git repositories open, and constantly switching windows makes the process feel very busy.

Perhaps, same can be achieved by enhancing sidebar navigation, it’s just tabs is something which comes to mind first.

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#3

this is already planned:

https://www.sublimetext.com/blog/articles/sublime-merge-roadmap

Tabs. Tabs have been frequently requested by users working on several repositories at once. The Switch Repository functionality (under the File menu) helps with this, but tabs have their own benefits, so they’re on their way.

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#4

It has been six months since the roadmap blog post. Is there any news about tabs in sublime merge. I paid for a license and this is a very important feature to me. I frequently work with 2-4 git repositories at the same time. I understand you are busy and appreciate all the good work going into sublime text and sublime merge.

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#5

FWIW, native MacOS tabs work with SM and ST. In the menubar, go to Window… Merge all Windows, New/Next/Previous Tabs. You can also define keyboard shortcuts for these items through your system’s keyboard preferences.

Not ideal nor cross-platform, but workable if you’re on Mac.

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#6

Good to know. Unfortunately I don’t really use mac. I use mainly Linux with some windows.

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#7

I completely agree with you. It’s taking too long to have this feature. I’m starting to try alternatives, like Fork. It’s almost impossible to work with SM when you have to deal with dozens of repositories and submodules at the same time. By the way, I have a license as well.

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#8

@dougcunha, thanks for the tip! I just checked it out, and it looks slick so far. Gonna give it a shot. I (admittedly, perhaps prematurely) paid for Merge trusting we’d see some solid progress and development, and I wanted to support the developer, but that shouldn’t prevent me from cutting losses haha. I’m sure Merge will come around but in the meantime… :eyes:

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#9

We have 20+ repositories and I wouldn’t call it ‘almost impossible to work with SM’: we use it in combination with SublimeText so the overview of all repositories is there, in a tree, with indication of git status, and opening SM is just a click/keystroke away. Ok there’s room for improvement in SublimeText (like showing number of commits away from remote a la SourceTree) and I wouldn’t say no to tabs but for me it’s pretty workable.

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#10

That’s great, stjin. If SM - as it is - works well for you, nothing to worry about! Not that I’m competing with you, but we have 80+ repositories. Of course, we don’t need to deal with all of them at once, but I feel that a tool like SM has to be of service. There’re a couple of tools like Fork and Sourcetree that offers tabs and are free. I preferred to pay for SM because I had a good experience with ST, and I was expecting faster updates and features delivery.
Cheers!

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#11

But isn’t the main selling point of e.g. SourceTree that it has a repository overview, not the tabs? I mean, tabs are great but don’t you normally use one tab at a time? Just trying to understand how tabs help with multiple repositories here.

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#12

For me it would be great since I do often work with multiple git submodules (thus repos) which are currently in different windows.

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#13

Usually, I need to deal with more than one repository at the same time. For example, I’m working in a feature for product A, which has more than one submodule. Meanwhile, we receive a request to fix a bug for product B, so I switch to another repository. At the end of the day, I need to make sure all my changes are submitted to our git server. If I have tabs, it’s quite simple. All the info I need is at a glance. Otherwise, I have to open all repositories to check if there is something to merge or to push.
I don’t know if you work for a big company with several products, but it’s our routine.

p.s. GitKraken has just released a new version. Can you guess what’s new? TABS!

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#14

Ah I see. We use a slightly different routine to achieve what you describe. The overview of what changed is either with a command line tool or just by looking at it in ST or another text editor supporting git status per project/directory. I guess tabs could work but I wouldn’t trust myself of keeping just the tabs open which have changes important, seeing at how I use tabs in other apps :slight_smile: Likewise to push all relevant changes we use a commandline saying ‘push all repos which have feature branch XXX’ which leaves less room for mistakes and is less work in general.

Interesting to hear about GitKraken having tabs now. I kinda liked the interface but eventually ditched it due to the builtin merge resolution constantly failing (IIRC something with newlines) and the bad startup time.

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#15

Few days ago I’ve tested a bit SublimeMerge and I must to say I’m extremely impressed with the speed that gives this tool in comparison to sourcetree (although I’m using a very old version of ST). With SM you can work nicely with really meaty repos such as Qt’s without breaking a sweat, which it’s truly amazing. While with sourcetree almost all operations when dealing with these big repos are slow as hell.

On the other hand, I must to point out that even if the SM’s speed is amazing and there are many UI elements I really like I think UI sourcetree is still better overall, for instance:

  1. With SourceTree you can organize repos in a tree structure using virtual folders and this is really important when your daily job involves dealing with many dozens if not hundreds of repos in the workspace.

  2. Sourcetree view space usage is “smarter” than SM’s. Sourcetree view is really compact and that will allow you to spot the commit overall status at once very fast on multiple repos easily.

  3. Sourcetree allows to select multiple commit items so you’ll be able apply multiple actions through a context menu, I think the choice of not having a context menu and having those 2 buttons/operations on the right of each commit change is an example of bad UI space usage. Also, each commit having its own collapsable diff on the bottom is not good… in SourceTree you can select multiple files and they will dump their diff on the same view, which leads to a better space usage.

Summing up, if you’d improve the UI to work with many repos while keeping the same speed I’d definitely find no more reasons to continue using SourceTree, for the meantime will still be a non-go :wink:

Pretty amazing tool anyway.

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#16

You can do that with SM, too. Unless you have something specific in mind that SM’s context menu does’t allow you to do?

I’d need screenshots to understand what you mean by this.

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