Sublime Forum

Screen reader accessibility

#22

OK, I’m not entirely convinced you are helping with either side of the debate to be honest, as you know nothing about how Sublime Text is developed, nor anything about accessibility, and seem to completely lack any empathy.

0 Likes

#23

Thanks for the reply. I should have replied to this post and ignored the other ones tbh.

A text editor built specifically for the visually impaired would be great, but is also far more than I think anyone is really expecting. Just basically want it to read the text in the editor - anything else would be a bonus, but it just doesn’t read anything at all. I can’t select text and have it read out, I can’t get VoiceOver to say anything. Honestly it never even occurred to me to have different pitches etc for syntax highlighting, and I’m not sure how usefult hat would be anyway.

I think lack of expertise is a strange argument because no software developers have any expertise until they do. As a developer myself, I am very often thrown into things I know nothing about, and it’s just part of the job to figure it out. It would be boring if I only worked on things I had specific expertise in.

Also the argument that you don’t have this user base is also strange. Maybe there isn’t a big market for it, I don’t know, but I would think implementing features with the intent of attracting new users is something you would do all the time.

But I do get the point that it might be too difficult given that the architecture of the UI. But it sounds like no one has the will to do anything about it and no one actually has any idea what would be involved.

0 Likes

#24

You aren’t helping either. You are only complaining, while being completely bad faith and dishonest. As seen in here:

Not only are you falsely accusing a company of discrimination. You also have the audacity to imply they are doing some kind of false advertisement. You are completely wrong on both accounts.

0 Likes

#25

I think lack of expertise is a strange argument because no software developers have any expertise until they do.

I’m not talking about expertise from the platform API side; I’m talking about knowing how to be accessible in the first place. Sublime Text has a fair number of features in relation to text editing and without direct knowledge of doing programming without vision I don’t see how we could possibly do a good job supporting those.

Also the argument that you don’t have this user base is also strange. Maybe there isn’t a big market for it, I don’t know, but I would think implementing features with the intent of attracting new users is something you would do all the time.

People generally don’t switch tools often, so the existing visually impaired pool of developers would not be attracted to using Sublime Text without us doing a better job than what they’re already using. At best you might get people new to programming, but that’s an even smaller niche.

0 Likes

#26

That is assuming that people start off visually impaired. I have a degenerative eye condition so am used to working with a variety of tools as a sighted person. It’s only now that I am finding that a lot of open doors are now closing my my face unexpededly.

I don’t have any experience in desktop development, but I used to be a web developer in a very small team (often just me) but accessibility was still a moral (and potentially legal) requirements. I am surprised that things like the Disability Discrimination Act don’t apply to software. It’s maybe something I need to look into.

My intention isn’t to give anyone a hard time over this. I’m sure you can understand my own personal depth of feeling on this matter, but so far I’ve not really heard anyone properly respond, other than speculate that it’s probably too hard and probably not worth bothering with, and a lot of presumptions being made.

0 Likes